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"Keeping family matters behind closed doors": healthcare providers' perceptions and experiences of identifying and managing domestic violence during and after pregnancy.

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McCauley, Mary ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1446-0625, Head, Jennifer, Lambert, Jaki, Zafar, Shamsa and van den Broek, Nynke ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8523-2684 (2017) '"Keeping family matters behind closed doors": healthcare providers' perceptions and experiences of identifying and managing domestic violence during and after pregnancy.'. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, Vol 17, Issue 1, p. 318.

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Abstract

Violence against women is an international public health concern and a violation of women's rights. Domestic violence can first occur, and increase in frequency and severity, during and after pregnancy. Healthcare providers have the potential to identify and support women who experience domestic violence. We sought to investigate the knowledge and perceptions of domestic violence among doctors who provide routine antenatal and postnatal care at healthcare facilities in Pakistan. In addition, we explored possible management options from policy makers, and enabling factors of and barriers to the routine screening of domestic violence. Semi-structured key informant interviews were conducted with doctors (n = 25) working in public and private hospitals and with officials involved in domestic violence policy development (n = 5) in Islamabad, Pakistan. Transcribed interviews were coded and codes grouped into categories. Thematic framework analysis was undertaken to identify emerging themes. Most doctors have a good awareness of domestic violence and a desire to help women who report domestic violence during and after pregnancy. Enabling factors included doctors' ability to build rapport and trust with women and their suggestion that further education of both healthcare providers and women would be beneficial. However, domestic violence is often perceived as a "family issue" that is not routinely discussed by healthcare providers. Lack of resources, lack of consultation time and lack of effective referral pathways or support were identified as the main barriers to the provision of quality care. Doctors and policy advisors are aware of the problem and open to screening for domestic violence during and after pregnancy. It is suggested that the provision of a speciality trained family liaison officer or healthcare provider would be beneficial. Clear referral pathways need to be established to provide quality care for these vulnerable women in Pakistan.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Antenatal care, Domestic violence, Healthcare providers, Maternal morbidity, Postnatal care, Pregnancy
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 309 Women's health
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 310 Maternal welfare
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WA Public Health > Health Administration and Organization > WA 546 Local Health Administration. Community Health Services
WA Public Health > Statistics. Surveys > WA 900 Public health statistics
WQ Obstetrics > WQ 100 General works
WQ Obstetrics > WQ 20 Research (General)
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-017-1520-4
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 24 Oct 2017 10:29
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2017 10:29
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/7664

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