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Multi-micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy for prevention of maternal anaemia and adverse birth outcomes in a high-altitude area: a prospective cohort study in rural Tibet of China.

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Kang, Yijun, Dang, Shaonong, Zeng, Lingxia, Wang, Duolao ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2788-2464, Li, Qiang, Wang, Jianpeng, Ouzhu, Luobu and Yan, Hong (2017) 'Multi-micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy for prevention of maternal anaemia and adverse birth outcomes in a high-altitude area: a prospective cohort study in rural Tibet of China.'. British Journal of Nutrition, Vol 118, Issue 6, pp. 431-440.

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Abstract

Anaemia during pregnancy, characterised by Hb <110 g/l, is a specific risk factor for adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in developing countries. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of daily antenatal supplementation with multiple micronutrients (MMN) compared with folic acid (FA) on the occurrence of anaemia among pregnant women and their infants' health in a high-altitude area. A prospective cohort study was carried out in two rural counties in Tibet from 2007 to 2012. A total of 1149 eligible pregnant women were allocated daily supplementation with FA in one county and MMN containing a recommended allowance of twenty-three vitamins and minerals in another county starting ≤24 weeks of gestation and continuing until delivery. Compared with the FA group, prenatal supplementation with MMN was significantly associated with reduced odds of anaemia in the third trimester. This was demonstrated in the primary outcome, with an adjusted OR (AOR) of 0·63; 95 % CI 0·45, 0·88 and P=0·007 and also reduced odds of preterm delivery (AOR: 0·31; 95 % CI 0·15, 0·61; P=0·001). There was no difference between MMN and FA groups in mean birth weight (adjusted mean difference: 36·78; 95 % CI -19·42, 92·98 g; P=0·200), whereas MMN supplementation significantly reduced the odds of low-birth weight (LBW) babies (AOR: 0·58; 95 % CI 0·36, 0·91; P=0·019). In conclusion, the antenatal MMN supplementation in rural Tibet is associated with a reduction of maternal anaemia in the third trimester, and may potentially decrease the risk of preterm delivery and LBW babies.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QY Clinical Pathology > Blood. Blood Chemistry > QY 450 Blood chemistry
W General Medicine. Health Professions > W 20.5 Biomedical research
WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WQ Obstetrics > WQ 100 General works
WQ Obstetrics > Pregnancy > WQ 200 General works
WQ Obstetrics > Pregnancy Complications > WQ 252 Hematologic complications
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1017/S000711451700229X
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 24 Oct 2017 15:32
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2017 10:18
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/7692

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