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Emergence of non-falciparum Plasmodium infection despite regular artemisinin combination therapy in a 18-month longitudinal study of Ugandan children and their mothers.

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Betson, Martha, Clifford, Sarah, Stanton, Michelle, Kabatereine, Narcis B and Stothard, Russell ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420 (2018) 'Emergence of non-falciparum Plasmodium infection despite regular artemisinin combination therapy in a 18-month longitudinal study of Ugandan children and their mothers.'. Journal of Infectious Disease, Vol 217, Issue 7, pp. 1099-1109.

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Abstract

As part of a longitudinal cohort investigation of intestinal schistosomiasis and malaria in Ugandan children and their mothers on the shorelines of Lakes Victoria and Albert, we documented risk factors and morbidity associated with non-falciparum Plasmodium infections and the longitudinal dynamics of Plasmodium species in children. Host age, household location and P. falciparum infection were strongly associated with non-falciparum Plasmodium infections, and P. malariae infection was associated with splenomegaly. Despite regular artemisinin combination therapy treatment, there was a threefold rise in P. malariae prevalence, which was not accountable for by increasing age of the child. Worryingly, our findings reveal the consistent emergence of non-falciparum infections in children, highlighting the complex dynamics underlying multi-species infections here. Given the growing body of evidence that non-falciparum malaria infections cause significant morbidity, we encourage better surveillance for non-falciparum Plasmodium infections, particularly in children, with more sensitive DNA detection methods and improved field-based diagnostics. [Abstract copyright: © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.]

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QV Pharmacology > Anti-Inflammatory Agents. Anti-Infective Agents. Antineoplastic Agents > QV 256 Antimalarials
QX Parasitology > Protozoa > QX 135 Plasmodia
WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 310 Maternal welfare
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 750 Malaria
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 430 Infancy
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 440 Preschool child
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix686
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2018 16:55
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2019 02:02
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/8134

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