LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Associations of smoking and alcohol consumption with healthy ageing: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies.

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Daskalopoulou, Christina, Stubbs, Brendon, Kralj, Carolina, Koukounari, Artemis, Prince, Martin and Prina, A Matthew (2018) 'Associations of smoking and alcohol consumption with healthy ageing: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies.'. BMJ Open, Vol 8, Issue 4, e019540.

[img]
Preview
Text
BMJ_Open_Associations of smoking and alcohol consumption with healty aging.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

The number of older people is growing across the world; however, quantitative synthesis of studies examining the impact of lifestyle factors on the ageing process is rare. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies to synthesise the associations of smoking and alcohol consumption with healthy ageing (HA). Major electronic databases were searched from inception to March 2017 (prospectively registered systematic reviews registration number CRD42016038130). Studies were assessed for methodological quality. Random-effect meta-analysis was performed to calculate pooled ORs and 95% CI. In total, we identified 28 studies (n=184 543); 27 studies reported results on smoking, 22 on alcohol consumption. 23 studies reported a significant positive association of never or former smoking with HA and 4 non-significant. 12 studies reported a significant positive association of alcohol consumption with HA, 9 no association and 1 negative. Meta-analysis revealed increased pooled OR of HA for never smokers compared with current smokers (2.36, 95% CI 2.03 to 2.75), never smokers compared with former smokers (1.32, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.41), former or never smokers compared with current smokers (1.72, 95% CI 1.20 to 2.47), never smokers compared with past or current smokers (1.29, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.43); drinkers compared with non-drinkers (1.28, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.52), light drinkers compared with non-drinkers (1.12, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.22), moderate drinkers compared with non-drinkers (1.35, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.97) and high drinkers compared with non-drinkers (1.25, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.44). There was considerable heterogeneity in the definition and measurement of HA and alcohol consumption. There is consistent evidence from longitudinal studies that smoking is negatively associated with HA. The associations of alcohol consumption with HA are equivocal. Future research should focus on the implementation of a single metric of HA, on the use of consistent drinking assessment among studies and on a full-range of confounding adjustment. Our research also highlighted the limited research on ageing in low-and-middle-income countries. [Abstract copyright: © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.]

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WM Psychiatry > WM 20 Research (General)
WT Geriatrics. Chronic Disease > Geriatrics > WT 100 General works
WT Geriatrics. Chronic Disease > Geriatrics > WT 104 Aging process
WT Geriatrics. Chronic Disease > Geriatrics > WT 141 Physical examination. Diagnosis. Diagnostic methods. Monitoring
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019540
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2018 13:30
Last Modified: 08 May 2018 13:52
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/8552

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item