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Triple Co-Administration of Ivermectin, Albendazole and Praziquantel in Zanzibar: A Safety Study

Mohammed, K. A., Haji, H. J., Gabrielli, A. F., Mubila, L., Biswas, G., Chitsulo, L., Bradley, M. H., Engels, D., Savioli, L. and Molyneux, David (2008) 'Triple Co-Administration of Ivermectin, Albendazole and Praziquantel in Zanzibar: A Safety Study'. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Vol 2, Issue 1, e171.

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Abstract

Background

Public health interventions based on distribution of anthelminthic drugs against lymphatic filariasis (LF), onchocerciasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) and schistosomiasis have been implemented separately to date. A better use of available resources might be facilitated by a more coordinated approach to control such infections, including the possibility of co-administering the three recommended anthelminthic drugs through a single, large-scale intervention.

Methodology/Principal Findings

Ivermectin, albendazole and praziquantel were co-administered to 5,055 children and adults living in areas endemic for LF, STH and schistosomiasis in Zanzibar, United Republic of Tanzania, during a pilot intervention aimed at elucidating and quantifying possible side-effects. Subsequently, these drugs were co-administered to about 700,000 individuals during a countrywide intervention targeting a large part of the total population of Zanzibar. Passive and active surveillance measures carried out during both interventions showed that side-effects attributable to the three drugs given at the same time were mild and self-limiting events.

Conclusions/Significance

Our data suggest that co-administration of ivermectin, albendazole and praziquantel is safe in areas where lymphatic filariasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis are co-endemic and where several rounds of treatment with one or two drugs have been implemented in the past. Passive surveillance measures, however, should be continued and detection, management and reporting of possible side-effects should be considered a key component of any health intervention administering drugs.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QV Pharmacology > QV 34 Experimental pharmacology (General)
QV Pharmacology > QV 38 Drug action.
QV Pharmacology > QV 4 General works
QV Pharmacology > Drug Standardization. Pharmacognosy. Medicinal Plants > QV 771 Standardization and evaluation of drugs
QX Parasitology > Helminths. Annelida > QX 200 Helminths
WA Public Health > WA 100 General works
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 800 Helminthiasis
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 810 Schistosomiasis
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 880 Filariasis and related conditions (General)
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > Disease Control Strategy Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0000171
Depositing User: Users 67 not found.
Date Deposited: 11 Aug 2010 15:39
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:00
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/864

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