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Anti-α-Gal antibodies detected by novel neoglycoproteins as a diagnostic tool for Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major

Subramaniam, Krishanthi, Austin, Victoria, Schocker, Nathaniel S., Montoya, Alba L., Anderson, Matthew S., Ashmus, Roger A., Mesri, Mina, Al-Salem, Waleed, Almeida, Igor C., Michael, Katja and Acosta Serrano, Alvaro ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2576-7959 (2018) 'Anti-α-Gal antibodies detected by novel neoglycoproteins as a diagnostic tool for Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major'. Parasitology, Vol 145, Issue 13, pp. 1758-1764.

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Abstract

Outbreaks of Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) have significantly increased due to the conflicts in the Middle East, with most of the cases occurring in resource-limited areas such as refugee settlements. The standard methods of diagnosis include microscopy and parasite culture, which have several limitations. To address the growing need for a CL diagnostic that can be field applicable, we have identified five candidate neoglycoproteins (NGPs): Galα (NGP3B), Galα(1,3)Galα (NGP17B), Galα(1,3)Galβ (NGP9B), Galα(1,6)[Galα(1,2)]Galβ (NGP11B), and Galα(1,3)Galβ(1,4)Glcβ (NGP1B) that are differentially recognized in sera from individuals with Leishmania major infection as compared with sera from heterologous controls. These candidates contain terminal, non-reducing α-galactopyranosyl (α-Gal) residues, which are known potent immunogens to humans. Logistic regression models found that NGP3B retained the best diagnostic potential (area under the curve from receiver-operating characteristic curve = 0.8). Our data add to the growing body of work demonstrating the exploitability of the human anti-α-Gal response in CL diagnosis

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Special Issue 13 (2017 Autumn Symposium of the British Society for Parasitology The multi-disciplinarity of parasitology: Host-parasite evolution in an ever changing world)
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 20.5 Research (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 300 General. Refugees
WR Dermatology > Parasitic Skin Diseases > WR 350 Tropical diseases of the skin. Mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Leishmaniasis
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1017/s0031182018000860
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2018 16:08
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2019 15:30
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/8793

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