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Exploring pancreatic pathology in Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients.

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Glaharn, Supattra, Punsawad, Chuchard, Ward, Steve ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2331-3192 and Viriyavejakul, Parnpen (2018) 'Exploring pancreatic pathology in Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients.'. Scientific Reports, Vol 8, Issue 1, p. 10456.

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Abstract

Hypoglycaemia is an important complication of Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection, which can be lethal if not treated. A decrease in blood sugar (BS) level has been correlated with disease severity, parasitaemia and the use of certain antimalarial drugs. This study explored the relationship between pancreatic pathology, including the expressions of insulin and glucagon in the islets of Langerhans, and the BS levels in P. falciparum malaria patients. Pancreatic tissues from malaria patients were divided into three groups, namely those with BS < 40 mg/dl, BS = 40-120 mg/dl, and BS > 120 mg/dl. In P. falciparum malaria, pancreatic tissues showed numerous parasitised red blood cells (PRBCs) in the capillaries, oedema, acinar necrosis and the presence of inflammatory cells. The islet size and the expression of insulin were significantly increased in P. falciparum malaria patients with hypoglycaemia. In addition, insulin expression was positively correlated with islet size and negatively correlated with BS levels. This pioneer study documents an increase in insulin expression and an increase in islet size in hypoglycaemic patients with P. falciparum malaria. This could contribute to the pathogenesis of hypoglycaemia and provides evidence for the potential need to effectively manage the hypoglycaemia seen in malaria infection.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QX Parasitology > Protozoa > QX 135 Plasmodia
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 750 Malaria
WI Digestive System > WI 20 Research (General)
WK Endocrine System > WK 20 Research (General)
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-28797-w
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 23 Jul 2018 14:14
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2018 14:14
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/8962

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