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Mobility and sex work: why, where, when? A typology of female-sex-worker mobility in Zimbabwe.

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Davey, Calum, Dirawo, Jeffrey, Mushati, Phillis, Magutshwa, Sitholubuhle, Hargreaves, James R and Cowan, Frances ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3087-4422 (2018) 'Mobility and sex work: why, where, when? A typology of female-sex-worker mobility in Zimbabwe.'. Social Science & Medicine, Vol 220, pp. 322-330.

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Abstract

Sex-worker mobility may have implications for health and access to care but has not been described in sub-Saharan Africa. We described sex-worker mobility in Zimbabwe and a mobility typology using data from 2591 and 2839 female sex workers in 14 sites from 2013 and 2016. We used latent class analysis to identify a typology of mobile sex workers. More women travelled for work in 2016 (59%) than in 2013 (27%), usually to find clients with more money (57% of the journeys), spending a median of 21 (2013) and 24 (2016) days away. A five-class mixture model best fitted the data, with 39% women in an infrequent work-mobility class, 21% in a domestic-high-mobility class, 16% in an international-high-mobility class, 16% in an infrequent opportunistic-non-work-mobility class, and 7% who travel with clients. More-mobile classes were better educated; risk behaviours differed by class. Mobility is increasing among sex worker in Zimbabwe, multi-faceted, and not explained by other vulnerabilities.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 309 Women's health
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WA Public Health > Statistics. Surveys > WA 900 Public health statistics
WA Public Health > Statistics. Surveys > WA 950 Theory or methods of medical statistics. Epidemiologic methods
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.11.027
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2018 12:07
Last Modified: 08 Jan 2019 13:47
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/9854

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