LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Interactions between fecal gut microbiome, enteric pathogens, and energy regulating hormones among acutely malnourished rural Gambian children

Nabwera, Helen, Espinoza, Josh L, Worwui, Archibald, Betts, Modupeh, Okoi, Catherine, Sesay, Abdul K, Bancroft, Rowan, Agbla, Schadrac C, Jarju, Sheikh, Bradbury, Richard S, Colley, Mariama, Jallow, Amadou T, Liu, Jie, Houpt, Eric R, Prentice, Andrew M, Antonio, Martin, Bernstein, Robin M, Dupont, Christopher L and Kwambana-Adams, Brenda A (2021) 'Interactions between fecal gut microbiome, enteric pathogens, and energy regulating hormones among acutely malnourished rural Gambian children'. EBioMedicine, Vol 73, p. 103644.

[img] Text
Nabwera-Espinoza_et_al_2021.10.05.docx - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (259kB)
[img]
Preview
Text
PIIS2352396421004370.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND
The specific roles that gut microbiota, known pathogens, and host energy-regulating hormones play in the pathogenesis of non-edematous severe acute malnutrition (marasmus SAM) and moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) during outpatient nutritional rehabilitation are yet to be explored.
METHODS
We applied an ensemble of sample-specific (intra- and inter-modality) association networks to gain deeper insights into the pathogenesis of acute malnutrition and its severity among children under 5 years of age in rural Gambia, where marasmus SAM is most prevalent.

FINDINGS
Children with marasmus SAM have distinct microbiome characteristics and biologically-relevant multimodal biomarkers not observed among children with moderate acute malnutrition. Marasmus SAM was characterized by lower microbial richness and biomass, significant enrichments in Enterobacteriaceae, altered interactions between specific Enterobacteriaceae and key energy regulating hormones and their receptors.
INTERPRETATION
Our findings suggest that marasmus SAM is characterized by the collapse of a complex system with nested interactions and key associations between the gut microbiome, enteric pathogens, and energy regulating hormones.  Further exploration of these systems will help inform innovative preventive and therapeutic interventions.
FUNDING
The work was supported by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC; MC-A760-5QX00) and the UK Department for International Development (DFID) under the MRC/DFID Concordat agreement; Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP 1066932) and the National Institute of Medical Research (NIMR), UK. This network analysis was supported by NIH U54GH009824 [CLD] and NSF OCE-1558453 [CLD].

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > Vitamins > QU 145 Nutrition. Nutritional requirements
QW Microbiology and Immunology > QW 4 General works. Classify here works on microbiology as a whole.
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 320 Child Welfare. Child Health Services.
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WS Pediatrics > Child Care. Nutrition. Physical Examination > WS 130 In childhood
WS Pediatrics > Diseases of Children and Adolescents > General Diseases > WS 200 General works
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103644
Depositing User: Julie Franco
Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2021 14:28
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2021 14:28
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/19540

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item