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Understanding evidence use from a programmatic perspective: conceptual development and empirical insights from national malaria control programmes

Parkhurst, Justin, Ghilardi, Ludovica, Webster, Jayne, Hoyt, Jenna, Hill, Jenny ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1588-485X and Lynch, Caroline A. (2020) 'Understanding evidence use from a programmatic perspective: conceptual development and empirical insights from national malaria control programmes'. Evidence & Policy. (In Press)

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Abstract

Background: Conceptualisations of what it means to use evidence in policymaking often appear divided between two extremes. On the one side are works presenting it as the implementation of research findings – particularly evaluations of intervention effect. In contrast stand theoretically informed works exploring the multiple meanings of evidence use, political complexities, and the constructed nature of research evidence itself. The first perspective has been criticised as over- simplistic, while the latter can make it difficult to answer questions of what might be good, or improved, uses of evidence in policymaking.

Methods: To further debate, this paper develops a ‘programmatic approach’ to evidence use, drawing on theories of institutional decision making and empirical work on evidence use within 11 National Malaria Control Programmes in Africa. We apply the programmatic approach by investigating the key goals and tasks of programme officials, recognising that these will shape the routines and logics followed affecting evidence utilisation. We then map out the forms, sources, features, and applications of evidence that serve programme officials in their goals.

Findings: In the case of malaria programmes, evidence use was understood in relation to tasks including: advocacy for funding, budget allocation, regulation development, national planning, and identification of information gaps – all of which might require different evidence sources, forms, and applications

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 240 Disinfection. Disinfestation. Pesticides (including diseases caused by)
WA Public Health > Health Administration and Organization > WA 525 General works
WA Public Health > Health Administration and Organization > WA 540 National and state health administration
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 750 Malaria
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 765 Prevention and control
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1332/174426420X15967828803210
Depositing User: Tracy Seddon
Date Deposited: 18 Sep 2020 08:04
Last Modified: 06 Apr 2021 14:17
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/15619

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