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Caregiver experiences and health care worker perspectives of accessing health care for low birth weight infants in rural Kenya.

Unsworth, Sarah, Barsosio, Hellen C, Achieng, Florence, Juma, Daniel, Tindi, Linda, Omiti, Fred, Kariuki, Simon and Nabwera, Helen M (2021) 'Caregiver experiences and health care worker perspectives of accessing health care for low birth weight infants in rural Kenya.'. Paediatrics and international child health. (In Press)

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Abstract

BACKGROUND
Low-birthweight (LBW) infants (<2500 g) are at greatest risk of mortality in the neonatal period, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Timely access to quality healthcare averts adverse outcomes.

AIM
To explore caregiver experiences and healthcare provider perspectives of accessing healthcare for LBW infants in rural Kenya.

METHODS

This qualitative study was undertaken in Homa Bay County of in rural western Kenya in June 2019. In-depth interviews with eleven caregivers and four healthcare providers were conducted by a trained research assistant. All interviews were transcribed verbatim, and transcripts in the local languages were translated into English. A thematic framework was used to analyse the data.

RESULTS
At the community and individual level,community misconceptions about LBW infants, inadequate infant care practices after discharge, lack of maternal support networks, long distances from healthcare facilities and lack of financial support were key challenges. In addition, long hospital waiting times, healthcare worker strikes and the apparent inadequate knowledge and skills of healthcare providers were disincentives among caregivers. Among healthcare providers, health system deficiencies (staff shortages and inadequate resources for optimal assessment and treatment of LBW infants) and maternal illiteracy were key challenges. Education by staff during antenatal visits and community support groups were enablers.

CONCLUSION

Accessing healthcare for LBW infants in this community is fraught with challenges which have implications for their post-discharge outcome. There is an urgent need to develop and test strategies to address the barriers at the community and health system level to optimise outcome..

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > W 21 Medicine as a profession.
W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 84 Health services. Delivery of health care
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WS Pediatrics > Child Care. Nutrition. Physical Examination > WS 141 Physical examination. Diagnosis. Mass screening. Monitoring
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 420 Newborn infants. Neonatology
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1080/20469047.2021.1881269
Depositing User: Julie Franco
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2021 15:29
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2021 10:03
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/17211

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