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The Recognition of Excessive blood loss At ChildbirTh (REACT) Study: A two‐phase exploratory, sequential mixed methods inquiry using focus groups, interviews, and a pilot, randomised crossover study

Hancock, A, Weeks, AD, Furber, C, Campbell, M and Lavender, Tina (2021) 'The Recognition of Excessive blood loss At ChildbirTh (REACT) Study: A two‐phase exploratory, sequential mixed methods inquiry using focus groups, interviews, and a pilot, randomised crossover study'. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. (In Press)

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Abstract

Objectives: To explore how childbirth-related blood loss is evaluated and excessive bleeding recognised; and develop and test a theory of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) diagnosis.
Design: Two-phase, exploratory, sequential mixed methods design using focus groups, interviews and a pilot, randomised crossover study.
Setting: Two hospitals in North West England.
Sample: Women (following vaginal birth with and without PPH), birth partners, midwives and obstetricians.
Methods: Phase one (qualitative): 8 focus groups and 20 one-to-one, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 women, 5 birth partners, 11 obstetricians, 1 obstetric anaesthetist and 19 midwives (n=51). Phase two (quantitative): 11 obstetricians and 10 midwives (n=21) completed two simulations of fast and slow blood loss using a high-fidelity childbirth simulator.
Results: Responses to blood loss were described as automatic, intuitive reactions to the speed, nature and visibility of blood flow. Health professionals reported that quantifying volume was most useful after a PPH diagnosis, to validate intuitive decisions and guide on-going management. During simulations, PPH treatment was initiated at volumes at or below 200ml (fast mean blood loss 79.6ml, SD 41.1; slow mean blood loss 62.6ml, SD 27.7). All participants treated fast, visible blood loss, but only half treated slow blood loss, despite there being no difference in volumes (difference 18.2ml, 95% CI -5.6 to 42.2ml, p=0.124).
Conclusions: Experience and intuition, rather than blood loss volume, inform recognition of excessive blood loss after birth. Women and birth partners want more information and open communication about blood loss. Further research exploring clinical decision-making and how to support it is required.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 310 Maternal welfare
WQ Obstetrics > Pregnancy Complications > WQ 240 Pregnancy complications (General)
WQ Obstetrics > Pregnancy Complications > WQ 252 Hematologic complications
WQ Obstetrics > Labor > WQ 330 Complications of labor
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.16735
Depositing User: Rachel Dominguez
Date Deposited: 28 May 2021 09:00
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2021 10:30
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/17918

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