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The Association Between Hormonal Contraceptive Use and Anemia Among Adolescent Girls and Young Women: An Analysis of Data From 51 Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Misumas, Christina, Hindin, Michelle J, Phillips-Howard, Penelope ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1018-116X and Sommer, Marni (2023) 'The Association Between Hormonal Contraceptive Use and Anemia Among Adolescent Girls and Young Women: An Analysis of Data From 51 Low- and Middle-Income Countries'. Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol 74, Issue 3, pp. 563-572.

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Abstract

Purpose
This study explores whether adolescent girls and young women aged 15–24 who use hormonal methods of contraception are more or less likely to be anemic than their peers. We further examine whether the association between anemia and hormonal contraception varies based on the severity of anemia or the duration of method use.

Methods
We conducted secondary analysis of data available for 51 low- and middle-income countries from the Demographic and Health Surveys. For each country, we used logistic regression models to explore the odds of being anemic (mildly, moderately, or severely) for those using hormonal methods of contraception. We also explored the odds of being moderately or severely anemic based on hormonal method use. Drawing on country-level effect estimates, we conducted meta-regression analyses to produce overall estimates of the association between anemia and hormonal contraception.

Results
Overall, adolescent girls and young women using hormonal methods had lower odds of being mildly, moderately, or severely anemic (adjusted odds ratio 0.68; p < .001) and lower odds of being moderately or severely anemic (adjusted odds ratio 0.57; p < .001) compared to those not using any contraception. Both short- and long-term users of hormonal methods had lower odds of being anemic and lower odds of being moderately or severely anemic compared to those not using hormonal methods.

Discussion
This study furthers our understanding of the association between anemia and use of hormonal contraception among adolescent girls and young women. More research is needed to assess causality and whether hormonal methods mediate the effects of heavy menstrual bleeding or other risk factors of anemia.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 309 Women's health
WH Hemic and Lymphatic Systems > Hematologic Diseases. Immunologic Factors. Blood Banks > WH 155 Anemia
WP Gynecology > Contraception > WP 630 Contraception
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 460 Adolescence (General)
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2023.09.013
Depositing User: Jane Rawlinson
Date Deposited: 27 Nov 2023 11:31
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2024 15:45
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/23534

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