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Venomics of the asp viper Vipera aspis aspis from France.

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Giribaldi, J, Kazandjian, Taline, Amorim, FG, Whiteley, Gareth, Wagstaff, Simon ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0577-5537, Cazals, G, Enjalbal, C, Quinton, L, Casewell, Nicholas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8035-4719 and Dutertre, S (2020) 'Venomics of the asp viper Vipera aspis aspis from France.'. Journal of Proteomics, Vol 218, p. 103707.

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Abstract

The asp viper Vipera aspis aspis is a venomous snake found in France, and despite its medical importance, the complete toxin repertoire produced is unknown. Here, we used a venomics approach to decipher the composition of its venom. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 80 venom-annotated sequences grouped into 16 gene families. Among the most represented toxins were snake venom metalloproteases (23%), phospholipases A2 (15%), serine proteases (13%), snake venom metalloprotease inhibitors (13%) and C-type lectins (12%). LC-MS of venoms revealed similar profiles regardless of the method of extraction (milking vs defensive bite). Proteomic analysis validated 57 venom-annotated transcriptomic sequences (>70%), including one for each of the 16 families, but also identified 7 sequences not initially annotated as venom proteins, including a serine protease, a disintegrin, a glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferase, a proactivator polypeptide-like and 3 aminopeptidases. Interestingly, phospholipases A2 were the dominant proteins in the venom, among which included an ammodytoxin B-like sequence, which may explain the reported neurotoxicity following some asp viper envenomations. In total, 87 sequences were retrieved from the Vipera aspis aspis transcriptome and proteome, constituting a valuable resource that will help in understanding the toxinological basis of clinical signs of envenoming and for the mining of useful pharmacological compounds.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > Genetics > QU 450 General Works
QU Biochemistry > Genetics > QU 460 Genomics. Proteomics
WD Disorders of Systemic, Metabolic or Environmental Origin, etc > Animal Poisons > WD 410 Reptiles
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2020.103707
Depositing User: Mary Creegan
Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2020 14:39
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2020 14:30
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/13803

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