LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Derivation of snake venom gland organoids for in vitro venom production

Puschhof, Jens, Post, Yorick, Beumer, Joep, Kerkkamp, Harald M., Bittenbinder, Matyas, Vonk, Freek J., Casewell, Nicholas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8035-4719, Richardson, Michael K. and Clevers, Hans (2021) 'Derivation of snake venom gland organoids for in vitro venom production'. Nature Protocols, Vol 16, pp. 1494-1510.

[img] Text
Puschoff et al 2020_Derivation of snake venom_Nature Protcols_Nov-20.docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 27 July 2021.

Download (86kB)

Abstract

More than 400,000 people each year suffer adverse effects following bites from venomous snakes. However, snake venom is also a rich source of bioactive molecules with known or potential therapeutic applications. Manually ‘milking’ snakes is the most common method to obtain venom. Safer alternative methods to produce venom would facilitate the production of both antivenom and novel therapeutics. This protocol describes the generation, maintenance and selected applications of snake venom gland organoids. Snake venom gland organoids are 3D culture models that can be derived within days from embryonic or adult venom gland tissues from several snake species and can be maintained long-term (we have cultured some organoids for more than 2 years). We have successfully used the protocol with glands from late-stage embryos and recently deceased adult snakes. The cellular heterogeneity of the venom gland is maintained in the organoids, and cell type composition can be controlled through changes in media composition. We describe in detail how to derive and grow the organoids, how to dissociate them into single cells, and how to cryopreserve and differentiate them into toxin-producing organoids. We also provide guidance on useful downstream assays, specifically quantitative real-time PCR, bulk and single-cell RNA sequencing, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and genetic engineering. This stepwise protocol can be performed in any laboratory with tissue culture equipment and enables studies of venom production, differentiation and cellular heterogeneity.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > Genetics > QU 550 Genetic techniques. PCR. Chromosome mapping
QW Microbiology and Immunology > Antigens and Antibodies. Toxins and Antitoxins > QW 630 Toxins. Antitoxins
WD Disorders of Systemic, Metabolic or Environmental Origin, etc > Animal Poisons > WD 400 General works
WD Disorders of Systemic, Metabolic or Environmental Origin, etc > Animal Poisons > WD 410 Reptiles
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1038/s41596-020-00463-4
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2021 10:57
Last Modified: 06 Apr 2021 14:31
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/16809

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item